Design For Good with Zimmer Children's Museum

verynice recently led a pro-bono design sprint benefitting the Zimmer Children's Museum in Los Angeles. The Zimmer Children’s Museum is a two-story playground of fun and thoughtful exhibits – a perfect environment for the creative and playful energy of an AIGA LA Design for Good workshop. Facilitating this workshop from beginning, middle, to end was both fun and challenging. verynice team members, Alisa Olinova, and Noah Goldberg-Jaffe share their experience. 

Alisa (L) and Noah (R) Photo: Kate Manos 

Alisa (L) and Noah (R) Photo: Kate Manos 

Alisa Olinova, Art Director, verynice
The process was like playing with blocks, except we were creating the holes and the shapes to sort. The Zimmer Children’s Museum provided the box and through a series of conversations with their Development and Communications Manager, we figured out what it’s holes were. We called these holes problems, that were shaped into four categories that could be explored by a diverse group of twenty to forty design-minded participants. Then we made sure that our groups of participants had the tools they needed to build their solutions.

Each of the groups presented ideas that would stand the test of time and be tangible for the organization--important building blocks in their transformation. I hope the participants also enjoyed the challenge and I’m excited to see what is to come for YouThink & The Zimmer Children’s Museum.

Noah Goldberg-Jaffe, Strategic Partnerships coordinator, verynice
Leading an AIGA Design for Good Workshop is an amazing opportunity to see brains in action, working together to create solutions for people they have never met and may never meet again. I love being charged with the responsibility of guiding a group of strangers with obvious professional skills to come together and really hash out some tough problems that, in this case, the Zimmer Museum/YouThink were facing.

The specific event was a blast because the ideas that came out of the groups seemed as well thought out as they were useful but also because we got to do our work in a children’s museum. Seeing a group of adult designers sitting in a life raft in a ball pit or at a child-sized table in the imaginary dining room is awesome. Not to mention being able to play with trucks at the same time. I hope that participants will stay involved and follow up by producing some of their ideas.